zimbabweans

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1 topic for zimbabweans
563 documents for zimbabweans
  • HARARE, Zimbabwe - On the surface, the process looked fair: Zimbabweans lined up peacefully and cast ballots Thursday in a parliamentary election President Robert Mugabe wants to vindicate his nearly 25-year rule. But opposition leaders and independent groups said the poll was stacked in Mugabe's favor.

  • AT THE SOUTH AFRICA-ZIMBABWE BORDER - For those desperate souls who would sneak across this frontier, consider the obstacles: armed bandits. A river, low this time of year but still populated by crocodiles and man-mauling hippos. Multiple rows of fences watched by zealous border guards. And all along the goal is to enter a country that's dangerously hostile to immigrants. Yet to escape President Robert Mugabe's Zimbabwe, the risks increasingly appear to be worth taking.

  • HARARE, Zimbabwe -- Fewer than 50,000 whites remain in authoritarian governed Zimbabwe, down from a peak of nearly 300,000 under white rule, according to recent census data published Monday. The number of white Zimbabweans has continued to drop since the census was conducted in August 2002 amid the seizure of thousands of white-owned commercial farms for redistribution to black Zimbabweans, analysts said. Some independent experts estimate fewer than 30,000 whites remain.

  • HARARE, Zimbabwe - Zimbabweans marked 26 years of independence Tuesday with little to celebrate amid deepening economic hardships, personal tragedies ...

  • When the heads of state of the Southern African Development Community convened last week in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to discuss the political situation in Zimbabwe, hopes among the Zimbabwean people ran high. President Robert Mugabe had recently extended his brutal efforts to crush dissent from his political opponents to include ordinary Zimbabweans. His ruling party left a trail of fractured bodies and two dead in its most recent crackdown. With the economy in shreds and the tense political situation posing a security threat not only to Zimbabwe but potentially to its neighbors, too, there was an expectation that African leaders would finally act.

  • South Africa is bracing for a mass exodus of cholera victims from Zimbabwe fleeing across the crocodile-infested Limpopo River in search of a doctor and enough food to keep them alive. The journey is not easy. The Limpopo River is moving faster now, swollen with early summer rains near its headwaters 1,200 miles away.

  • Since Zimbabwe started using the U.S.dollar as its currency, in 2009, it has run into a surprising dilemma. Once worth too little, Zimbabwe's money is now worth too much. When Zimbabweans say they are waiting for change, they are usually talking about politics. After all, the country has had the same leader since 1980.

  • President Robert G. Mugabe has begun pressuring companies to comply with a law requiring that black Zimbabweans own more than half their shares. More than a decade after the Zimbabwean government began seizing sprawling white-owned commercial farms, a new fight is brewing here over who will profit from the nation's huge bounty of platinum, chromium, nickel and diamonds.

  • HARARE, Zimbabwe - The arrests of Zimbabweans gathered to discuss what they could learn from uprisings in North Africa drew international condemnation. They turned out to be just the start of harassment of people hardline supporters of longtime ruler Robert Mugabe consider enemies. A key aide to Morgan Tsvangirai - Mugabe's rival and partner in an uneasy coalition - was arrested on corruption charges. The offices of Tsvangirai's party have been raided, and members arrested. An independent civic group leader was detained for several hours over the weekend for possessing T-shirts police claimed were intended to incite opposition to Mugabe's authoritarian rule.

  • Illegal Zimbabwean immigrants, who work as farm laborers for a little more than a U.S. dollar a day, inside their room on a farm near the Beitbridge border post, between South Africa and Zimbabwe, in the Limpopo Province....

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