Ralph Yarborough

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178 documents for Ralph Yarborough
  • Jim Boren, another former aide, remembers [Ralph W. Yarborough] at his peak. In the summer of '56, Boren showed up at Yarborough campaign headquarters with "two weeks of vacation and a station wagon." By the end of the campaign he was manager, a position he kept when Yarborough ran for Senate the following year. Boren, an author and retired professor at Oklahoma's Northeastern State University, remembers the courthouse circuit in those years well: "We had some boys that played music, and they were called the Cass County Coon Hunters. So we would send that team, those musicians, country-style music, ahead to get the crowd together as he was coming in from the last stop. ... As he was coming into the edge of town, they'd say, 'Here, he's coming now!' So we'd get the crowd all excited, and...

  • ...Senator Yarborough, the principal sponsor and floor manager of the ...As initially introduced by Senator Ralph Yarborough in 1967, 4(f)(2) did not recognize any ...

  • Somehow the slogan didn't do the trick. [Creekmore Fath] finished third in the Democratic primary. Then he went to work, with mixed feelings, for [Lyndon Johnson]'s Senate campaign. Liberals like Fath had never been cozy with the future president's go-with-the-political-wind ideology. "We viewed Johnson with some reserve," Fath wrote, with appropriate reserve, decades later in an autobiographical essay. He might have added liberalism to the list. After failing in his one run for elective office, Fath went on to be a political rainmaker and strategist behind the '50s and '60s [Ralph Yarborough] campaigns, and the early '70s near-misses of Sissy Farenthold for governor. "He could pick up the phone and call," Farenthold recalls, and "I don't care what county it was, he'd know somebody ther...

  • As I chose Option 1 (for English) in swiping my credit card, I wondered how we got to having Spanish reach into the most remote parts of the United States. And why, as we debate health care bills, no one has mentioned the "unintended consequences" of legislation, which is why we are now pressing buttons to specify what language we want to use. Ralph Yarborough was a U.S. senator from Texas (1957-71) who faced tough elections, and he catered to Mexican-Americans to win. He sponsored all kinds of bills directed to that group.

  • American Dynasty, which jumped to the No. 2 spot on The New York Times Best Seller List as [Kevin Phillips] began his book tour, is a scathing indictment of the Bushes. It's also an important book because it is a carefully researched chronicle of one family's special place in America's plundering class. But it's more than a chronicle of unprosecuted corporate crime. Michael Lind's Made in Texas was an attempt to define the Bushes by geographical and cultural determinism. It was a fascinating book, but a bit of a stretch. Phillips' thesis, sustained by the historical and journalistic documentation he pulls together to support it, is spot on. The public policy that four generations of the Bush family have inflicted on the American people is an extension of their family history. The book i...

    ...Phillips quotes Texas Senator Ralph Yarborough using the senior Bush's business ties ...

  • DYNASTIES in American politics are dangerous. We saw it with the Kennedys, we may well see it with the Clintons, and we're certainly seeing it with the Bushes. Between now and the November election, it's crucial that Americans come to understand how four generations of the current president's family have embroiled the United States in the Middle East through CIA connections, arms shipments, rogue banks, inherited war policies, and personal financial links. As early as 1964, George H.W. Bush, running for the U.S. Senate from Texas, was labeled by incumbent Democrat Ralph Yarborough as a hireling of the sheik of Kuwait, for whom Bush's company drilled offshore oil wells. Over the four decades since then, the ever- reaching Bushes have emerged as the first U.S. political clan to thoroughly...

  • The first Texas Observer was published almost exactly 55 years ago, on Dec. 13, 1954. It was a sad thing to look at. All that broke up the long ragged columns of type on the front page was a grainy shot of Mrs. Bob Hughes, "20-year-old Port Arthur housewife," striking a winsome pose from the picket line of the long-running Port Arthur strike. There was also a pair of sharply reported stories about the strike, which the state attorney general had called part of "a Communist plot to take over Gulf oil ports." On the back page- page 8- sat a big ugly ad for Tomorrow's Victory, a book meant to inspire and organize liberal Democrats after their man, Ralph Yarborough, lost the '54 governor's race. Proceeds from the book sales went to the Democratic Deficit Committee. We see our approach, more...

  • Former Treasury Secretary Lloyd Bentsen, who won respect from both sides of the aisle in his 28 years in Congress and as the 1988 Democratic vice-presidential nominee, died yesterday at his Houston home, his family said. He was 85. Mr. Bentsen, a pro-free-enterprise Democrat who was successful in business before he went into politics, handed George Bush his first electoral defeat in the 1970 race for the U.S. Senate seat once held by liberal Democrat Ralph Yarborough.

  • Born in Bogalusa, Louisiana, [Woodrow Seals] came to Texas for law school after serving in what he would always describe as "the second Great War." He settled in Houston and, like his friend Wayne Justice in Tyler, was appointed to the federal bench by Lyndon Johnson at the recommendation of the late U.S. Sen. Ralph Yarborough, patron saint of a generation of Texas liberals. Like Justice, Seals presided over several landmark school desegregation cases. Unlike Justice, whose ostracism by the local community was almost as legendary as the rulings that prompted it, Seals was a gregarious participant in a wide range of community activities. During the trial of the alien school case, he occasionally baffled attorneys with off-the-cuff remarks prompted by outside reading: for instance, engagi...

  • Houston oilman George Bush, son of former Connecticut Sen. Prescott Bush, launches his first bid for public office by winning the Republican race for Senate nomination in Texas. He faces Democrat Ralph Yarborough in November.

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